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USU Psychology Professor Appointed to Utah Psychologist Licensing Board

02/08/2021

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Dr. Melanie Domenech Rodríguez
Dr. Melanie Domenech Rodríguez

Dr. Melanie Domenech Rodríguez, professor of psychology in the Combined Clinical/Counseling specialization at Utah State University, was appointed to the Psychologist Licensing Board for the State of Utah on January 13, 2021. This board, whose members are appointed by the executive director of the Utah Department of Commerce with concurrence of the governor, regulates activities in the field of psychology and issues licenses for practice in the State of Utah.

“Licensure ensures that a minimum standard of training and professional practice standards are met for licensed providers, thus protecting both the profession and the public,” said Domenech Rodríguez. “The tools and knowledge of applied psychology are intended to contribute to health and wellbeing of people, groups, and communities. It is critical that psychologists thoughtfully, deliberately, and proactively ensure the public is not harmed.”

There are four types of psychology licenses available in Utah: psychologist, certified psychology resident, behavior analyst, and assistant behavior analyst. In total, there are more than 1,600 individuals licensed to practice psychology in the State of Utah today.

A preeminent researcher, Domenech Rodríguez’s work addresses health disparities. Her work on cultural adaptations of evidence-based interventions addresses health disparities in access, acceptability, and effectiveness of treatment for ethnic and culturally diverse people. She is excited to add her perspective to this new opportunity.

“It is an honor for me to be able to serve the state board that has licensed me since 2003,” said Domenech Rodríguez. “My hope is to contribute expertise in cultural diversity, ethics, and evidence-based interventions. A thoughtful analysis of protections requires the consideration of equity, diversity, and inclusion as important contexts of psychological practice.”